GIS vs Geospatial

Difference Between GIS, Geospatial Data and Geospatial Informations 

 

Geographic Information System (GIS)

A geographic information system (GIS) is a computer system for capturing, storing, checking, and displaying data related to positions on Earth's surface. GIS can show many different kinds of data on one map. This enables people to more easily see, analyze, and understand patterns and relationships. 

 

With GIS technology, people can compare the locations of different things in order to discover how they relate to each other. For example, using GIS, the same map could include sites that produce pollution, such as gas stations, and sites that are sensitive to pollution, such as wetlands. Such a map would help people determine which wetlands are most at risk. 

 

GIS can use any information that includes location. The location can be expressed in many different ways, such as latitude and longitude, address, or ZIP code. Many different types of information can be compared and contrasted using GIS. The system can include data about people, such as population, income, or education level. It can include information about the land, such as the location of streams, different kinds of vegetation, and different kinds of soil. It can include information about the sites of factories, farms, and schools, or storm drains, roads, and electric power lines. 

 

Geospatial Data

Geospatial data, GIS data or geodata has explicit geographic positioning information included within it, such as a road network from a GIS, or a geo-referenced satellite image. Geospatial data may include attribute data that describes the features found in the dataset. 

 

There are two types of geospatial data - vector and raster. Vector data uses the simple geometric objects of points, lines, and areas (polygons) to represent spatial features. Raster data uses a grid to represent its geographic information. Points are represented by single cells, lines by sequences of neighbouring cells, and areas by collection of grouping cells. 

 

Geospatial Information 

Geospatial information, also known as location information, is information describing the location and names of features beneath, on or above the earth's surface. At its simplest this can mean the basic topographical information found on a map. On a more complex level it can include different location-related datasets combined into layers that show information such as land use and population density.